Firefox 3.6.4 fixes several security issues

Mozilla released Firefox 3.6.4 that fixes several security issues as well as stability issues.

User tracking across sites using Math.random()
Security researcher Amit Klein reported that it was possible to reverse engineer the value used to seed Math.random(). Since the pseudo-random number generator was only seeded once per browsing session, this seed value could be used as a unique token to identify and track users across different web sites.

Content-Disposition: attachment ignored if Content-Type: multipart also present
Security researcher Ilja van Sprundel of IOActive reported that the Content-Disposition: attachment HTTP header was ignored when Content-Type: multipart was also present. This issue could potentially lead to XSS problems in sites that allow users to upload arbitrary files and specify a Content-Type but rely on Content-Disposition: attachment to prevent the content from being displayed inline.

focus() behavior can be used to inject or steal keystrokes
Google security researcher Michal Zalewski reported that focus() could be used to change a user’s cursor focus while they are typing, potentially directing their keyboard input to an unintended location. This behavior was also present across origins when content from one domain was embedded within another via an iframe. A malicious web page could use this behavior to steal keystrokes from a victim while they were typing sensitive information such as a password.

Integer Overflow in XSLT Node Sorting
Security researcher Martin Barbella reported via TippingPoint’s Zero Day Initiative that an XSLT node sorting routine contained an integer overflow vulnerability. In cases where one of the nodes to be sorted contained a very large text value, the integer used to allocate a memory buffer to store its value would overflow, resulting in too small a buffer being created. An attacker could use this vulnerability to write data past the end of the buffer, causing the browser to crash and potentially running arbitrary code on a victim’s computer.

Heap buffer overflow in nsGenericDOMDataNode::SetTextInternal
Security researcher Nils of MWR InfoSecurity reported that the routine for setting the text value for certain types of DOM nodes contained an integer overflow vulnerability. When a very long string was passed to this routine, the integer value used in creating a new memory buffer to hold the string would overflow, resulting in too small a buffer being allocated. An attacker could use this vulnerability to write data past the end of the buffer, causing a crash and potentially running arbitrary code on a victim’s computer.

Freed object reuse across plugin instances
Microsoft Vulnerability Research reported that two plugin instances could interact in a way in which one plugin gets a reference to an object owned by a second plugin and continues to hold that reference after the second plugin is unloaded and its object is destroyed. In these cases, the first plugin would contain a pointer to freed memory which, if accessed, could be used by an attacker to execute arbitrary code on a victim’s computer.

Crashes with evidence of memory corruption (rv:1.9.2.4/ 1.9.1.10)
Mozilla developers identified and fixed several stability bugs in the browser engine used in Firefox and other Mozilla-based products. Some of these crashes showed evidence of memory corruption under certain circumstances, and we presume that with enough effort at least some of these could be exploited to run arbitrary code.

OPIS

Subscribe to the Help Net Security breaking news e-mail alerts:

OPIS

Don't miss