Firefox 3.5.6 fixes several security issues

Mozilla released Firefox 3.5.6 that fixes several security issues.

Privilege escalation via chrome window.opener
Security researcher David James reported that a content window which is opened by a chrome window retains a reference to the chrome window via the window.opener property. Using this reference, content in the new window can access functions inside the chrome window, such as eval, and use these functions to run arbitrary JavaScript code with chrome privileges. In a stock Mozilla browser a remote attacker can not cause these application dialogs to appear nor to automatically load the attack code that takes advantage of this flaw in window.opener. There may be add-ons which open potentially hostile web-content in this way, and combined with such an add-on the severity of this flaw could be upgraded to Critical.

Location bar spoofing vulnerabilities
Security researcher Jonathan Morgan reported that when a page loaded over an insecure protocol, such as http: or file:, sets its document.location to a https: URL which responds with a 204 status and empty response body, the insecure page will receive SSL indicators near the location bar, but will not have its page content modified in any way. This could lead to a user believing they were on a secure page when in fact they were not.

Security researcher Jordi Chancel reported an issue similar to one fixed in mfsa2009-44 in which a web page can set document.location to a URL that can’t be displayed properly and then inject content into the resulting blank page. An attacker could use this vulnerability to place a legitimate-looking but invalid URL in the location bar and inject HTML and JavaScript into the body of the page, resulting in a spoofing attack.

NTLM reflection vulnerability
Security researcher Takehiro Takahashi of the IBM X-Force reported that Mozilla’s NTLM implementation was vulnerable to reflection attacks in which NTLM credentials from one application could be forwarded to another arbitary application via the browser. If an attacker could get a user to visit a web page he controlled he could force NTLM authenticated requests to be forwarded to another application on behalf of the user.

Integer overflow, crash in libtheora video library
Security researcher Dan Kaminsky reported an integer overflow in the Theora video library. A video’s dimensions were being multiplied together and used in particular memory allocations. When the video dimensions were sufficiently large, the multiplication could overflow a 32-bit integer resulting in too small a memory buffer being allocated for the video. An attacker could use a specially crafted video to write data past the bounds of this buffer, causing a crash and potentially running arbitrary code on a victim’s computer.

Memory safety fixes in liboggplay media library
Mozilla discovered several bugs in liboggplay which posed potential memory safety issues. The bugs which were fixed could potentially be used by an attacker to crash a victim’s browser and execute arbitrary code on their computer.

Crashes with evidence of memory corruption (rv:1.9.1.6/ 1.9.0.16)
Mozilla developers and community members identified and fixed several stability bugs in the browser engine used in Firefox and other Mozilla-based products. Some of these crashes showed evidence of memory corruption under certain circumstances and we presume that with enough effort at least some of these could be exploited to run arbitrary code.




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